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Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Writer/Curator/Founder of The Autism Acceptance Project. Contributing Author to Between Interruptions: Thirty Women Tell the Truth About Motherhood, and Concepts of Normality by Wendy Lawson, and soon to be published Gravity Pulls You In. Writing my own book. Lecturer on autism and the media and parenting. Current graduate student Critical Disability Studies and most importantly, mother of Adam -- a new and emerging writer.

“There is no hope unmingled with fear, and no fear unmingled with hope.” -- Baruch Spinoza

Thursday, November 09, 2006

 

Young Blogger Asks Age Old Question

To cure or not to cure, that is the question. This is a post by a 20 year old David, who decided to take a year off college to persue this project in his blog titled Growing Up With a Disability.He is recording both personal stories and stories of others with disabilities. Here is an excerpt from his post, which is applicable to autism:


My first interviewee, “Ashley,” discussed her perspective on a cure for her learning disability. Ashley said she would only accept a cure if it were on her terms. What society calls rigidity and stubbornness, Ashley calls discipline and focus. From her challenges, Ashley has learned patience and perseverance. She feels aspects of her learning disability have helped her become skilled at math, science, martial arts, and fitness. Ashley wonders if a one-size-fits-all cure of her learning disability could rid her of some of her very best qualities.

Many people who have made valuable contributions in society are thought to have had learning disabilities. Would Leonardo da Vinci, Pablo Picasso, Albert Einstein, and Winston Churchill have wished there had been a cure? What about Jay Leno and Robin Williams? Would these and other people with learning disabilities share the same concerns about a cure as Ashley? Would the unique talents and gifts of these scientific and creative individuals be lost if their disabilities were cured?

I wonder how Franklin Delano Roosevelt would have been a different leader had he not had the perspective and skills learned from dealing with polio. How would Stevie Wonder and Ray Charles be different musicians if they were sighted? How would Beethoven's 9th Symphony be different if he had not lost his hearing?

These are interesting questions to think about. We, as a society, are quick to point out the negatives of a person's disability; with a little effort, strengths can be seen too. Disability is a natural part of human diversity and should be respected and treasured.


Thanks, David!

2 Comments:

Blogger mcewen said...

Diversity! What a delightful word. So many possibilities.

6:22 PM  
Blogger 'Thought & Humor' said...

.

Take Dr. Phil's Test:


(Dr. Phil scored 55; he did this test
on Oprah - she got a 38.) Some folks
pay a lot of money to find this stuff out!

Read on, this is very interesting!

Don't be overly sensitive! The following is
pretty accurate and it only takes 2 minutes.
Take this test for yourself.

Don't peek, but begin the test as you scroll
down and answer.

Answers are for who you are now --- not who
you were in the past. Have pen or pencil and
paper ready.

This is a real test given by the Human Relations
Dept. at many of the major corporations today.
It helps them get better insight concerning their
employees and prospective employees. It's only
10 Simple questions, so grab a pencil and paper,
keeping track of your letter answers to each question.

Ready??

Begin.



1. When do you feel your best?
a) in the morning
b) during the afternoon & early evening
c) late at night



2. You usually walk.
a) fairly fast, with long steps
b) fairly fast, with little steps
c) less fast head up, looking the world in the face
d) less fast, head down
e) very slowly



3. When talking to people you...
a) stand with your arms folded
b) have your hands clasped
c) have one or both your hands on your hips
d) touch or push the person to whom you are talking
e) play with your ear, touch your chin, or smooth your hair



4. When relaxing, you sit with...
a) your knees bent with your legs neatly side by side
b) your legs crossed
c) your legs stretched out or straight
d) one leg curled under you


5. When something really amuses you, you react with...
a) big appreciated laugh
b) a laugh, but not a loud one
c) a quiet chuckle
d) a sheepish smile


6. When you go to a party or social gathering you...
a) make a loud entrance so everyone notices you
b) make a quiet entrance, looking around for someone you know
c) make the quietest entrance, trying to stay unnoticed



7. You're working very hard, concentrating
hard, and you're interrupted...
a) welcome the break
b) feel extremely irritated
c) vary between these two extremes


8. Which of the following colors do you like most?
a) Red or orange
b) black
c) yellow or light blue
d) green
e) dark blue or purple
f) white
g) brown or gray



9. When you are in bed at night, in those last
few moments before going to sleep you are...
a) stretched out on your back
b) stretched out face down on your stomach
c) on your side, slightly curled
d) with your head on one arm
e) with your head under the covers


10. You often dream that you are...
a) falling
b) fighting or struggling
c) searching for something or somebody
d) flying or floating
e) you usually have dreamless sleep
f) your dreams are always pleasant





*Answers are located Here
for your convenience & felicity
at my obsequious blog.

6:24 PM  

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